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howtoskinatiger:

africanartblog:

This is just mind boggling.

I can’t for the life of me understand why anyone in their right mind would get satisfaction from harming these beautiful Leopards.

It really makes my blood boil.

Please sign the petition, it only takes a minute of your time.

We have to speak up, the poor Leopards can’t do it.

Read below it’s disgusting behavior.

Bruce Watson (middle) has killed 109 leopards and 57 lions !!!!

He was born in 1977 and at the age of 18 became the youngest person ever to get a full professional hunter’s license in Zimbabwe. After joining Swanepoel and Scandrol Safaris he guided up to 300 days a year throughout Ethiopia, Cameroon, Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Namibia and South Africa. In addition he helped guide clients in Tajikistan, Australia and the Arctic Circle. Cliff has guided clients to over 115 different species of game in Africa, and up to date he has taken 109 leopard and 57 lions. His company, Rifa Safari Area, recently started with Bruce Watson, has one of Zimbabwe’s top areas for the next 10 years.

https://www.facebook.com/bruce.watson.5076?fref=ts

http://www.brucewatsonsafaris.com/

PETITION: http://www.thepetitionsite.com/764/086/272/stop-the-illegal-slaughter-of-leopards/?cid=FB_TAF

(Pictured:Cliff Walker, Bruce Watson and Doug Scandrol)

image

Shame on you so called men.

Please sign the petition.

Regards

Tania Bale

African Art Online.Com

Except this is not illegal. Trophy hunting of big game is perfectly legal in many parts of Africa. Not only is it perfectly legal, it also benefits leopards and other animals! 

Trophy hunting in Africa has helped to save many species that would otherwise be poached into extinction. Poaching is unregulated and depletes populations. Legal trophy hunting is highly regulated. Only a certain number of each species can be killed depending on the health and stability of the population in the region. Each animal killed is selected beforehand, usually because it is either sick, injured or too old to breed. Keeping such animals alive only harms the productive members of the population by taking away food and territory, so killing them opens up more space for healthy, breeding animals. In areas where trophy hunting takes place the population of endangered species like leopards, lions and rhinos are significantly higher and more stable than in areas with no hunting. Good conservation management isn’t just about keeping every member of a species alive at all costs. It’s about doing what works and removing individuals that are problematic or no longer productive. Also since these animals were likely to die anyway why not get vital funds from that animal by allowing a hunter to kill it?

Trophy hunting also elevates these animals above the status of pest. If it wasn’t for the protection that trophy hunting offers these animals would just be shot by locals as pests because they attack livestock. Giving them a value encourages locals to tolerate them. The money paid by big game hunters also goes directly back into the conservation of the remaining animals in the area, as well as protecting them from poaching. Without these funds they could not afford to properly protect these animals, and national parks without hunting are plagued by poaching. Yet game hunting parks suffer relatively little poaching. Game ranches also give jobs to local people, put money back into the local economy and even donate extra meat to feed local families. Take away all this and you leave the wildlife vulnerable to exploitation and depletion.

Trophy hunting in Africa is supported by many big name conservation groups, including the World Wildlife Fund and Save The Rhino because they recognize the benefits and clear results it has. It may seem distasteful to kill an endangered species, but fact is the system is the most effective we have to protect these animals and has been proven time and again to work, not only in protecting species but boosting their numbers.

WWF: Hunting for Conservation

Hunting as a Conservation Tool

Trophy Hunting in the Context of Community Conservation 

Trophy Hunting Can Help African Conservation 

Important stuff.

Posted 4 months ago with 119 notes
Reblogged from howtoskinatiger
Originally from africanartblog
© africanartblog
Tagged with #hunting #conservation #leopards
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    The money required to purchase a hunting license like that often goes directly into conservation efforts. Many people...
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    Important stuff.
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    Reblogging for howtoskinatiger's response. Please read!
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